Hemorrhoids, Fissures and Tears, OH MY!

February 9, 2016 in Childbirth, Pelvic Floor, Post Partum, Pregnancy

Hemorrhoids, Fissures and Tears, OH MY!

Let’s talk about something! It’s not a pleasant subject. It’s the nasty little triad of issues one might face after having a vaginal birth.  I’m talking about the after effects and trauma that can happen to your bottom. It’s rarely discussed before a birth and I believe there is a reason for that.   The physical injury to the pelvic floor area from a vaginal birth can cause significant damage that leads to some rather unpleasant, uncomfortable and down right painful issues some women have to face.   I’m talking about hemorrhoids, fissures and tears that occur in the perineum during, for hemorrhoids, and after birth for all three. There are some things you need to know to help you deal with these uncomfortable issues if you find you have developed these.

HEMORRHOIDS

Let’s start with hemorrhoids!

Hemorrhoids are a swelling and inflammation of veins in or around the anus and lower part of the rectum. They can be painful and itchy. Hemorrhoids are very common in pregnancy as the increased weight from carrying the baby causes greater pressures on the pelvic floor. Also prenatal vitamins and hormones cause a slowing down of your colon and swelling of your veins, two factors contributing to constipation that can lead to hemorrhoids.

So to avoid hemorrhoids you’ll want to avoid constipation and the bearing down that usually goes along with it.

The first step is to avoid being constipated.

Diet has a huge implication on constipation. (Please consult a nutritionist for greater help with your diet) By eating more fiber rich foods you can help keep things moving in your colon. Raw veggies are a great way to increase fiber or adding flax seeds to your foods can help too. Be careful in adding too much fiber at first if things aren’t moving well especially if you aren’t doing this next thing.

That is, drinking enough water. Increasing your water intake, especially when you are breastfeeding, will bring more water to help keep things flowing through your colon. Moving your body will also do the same.

The next step it to use good toileting habits. When you sit on the toilet, you want to make sure you keep your back straight and lean forward. Avoid sitting slumped on the toilet. It can help to have your knees higher than your hips. There is the squotty potty chair you can purchase to help with this or you can use two yoga blocks, toilet paper rolls or a big fat can of tomatoes and put your feet upon.

To relax your pelvic floor you can try making different sounds to see which sound bulges your pelvic floor downward more easily. Take a deep breath and say “Grrr!” or “Shhhh” and see which one lengthens your pelvic floor. Use that sound during your next bowel movement to help move things down and out so your pelvic floor stays relaxed!

Once a hemorrhoid is in place you need to decrease any excess pressure on this tissue in order for it to heal. With all the bearing down that happens in birth the rectal tissues need to learn to come back up in and inside again. That can only happen when you avoid bearing down during a bowel movement after your birth. It’s important to allow your stool to pass on it’s own without you having to force it out. Any forcefulness will only exacerbate your hemorrhoids.

Also when dealing with hemorrhoids after birth, I find you also have to address the soft tissue in your vaginal and anal openings.   We’ll cover how to do this later in this article.

Around the anal opening is a sphincter muscle. It’s very common for this muscle to have small “knots” in it from the birth, especially if you tore. These knots don’t allow the muscles to expand evenly to allow your stool to come out. When a hemorrhoid is present, most likely there is a restriction or “knot” in these tissues that can prevent the hemorrhoid from healing. They can also lead to an even greater problem and that is a fissure!

FISSURES

A fissure is a open tear inside the rectal tissues.   Fissures have to be one of THE most painful conditions to recover from after birth.   The problem with this condition is the tear has a hard time healing because it gets reopened every time you have a bowel movement.   It makes having a bowel movement EXTREMELY painful! Some women, who have a fissure, report having chills, breaking out into a sweat and even their whole body shaking after having a bowel movement. The pain afterwards can last for hours. When dealing with a fissure for any length of time the anticipation of a bowel movement can bring fear and greater tightness to the pelvic floor area, which creates a vicious cycle that is hard to break. It’s no fun at all!

There is one thing that has helped my clients when dealing with a fissure and that is to massage their perineum and anal sphincter prior to a bowel movement. Usually there is increased tension in the anal sphincter that is on the opposite side of where the fissure lies. When you release this knot prior to a bowel movement it can lessen the pressures placed on the fissure and allow it to heal a little bit easier.   Stay tuned to learn how to massage your anal sphincter area.

 

TEARING IN YOUR PERINEUM

The third issue that is closely related to hemorrhoids and fissures is tearing in your perineum. Unfortunately tearing from birth is very common for women. Scar tissue forms to help heal a tear. Scar tissue is not as flexible as normal tissue and restricts the tissue mobility in the area. This can inhibit a stools flow out the anal sphincter and contribute to the development and prevent the healing of hemorrhoids and fissures. Mobilizing this scar tissue can help soften the tissues and allow easier flow with less pressures, helping both issues heal.

 

Caring for your Perineum After Birth

So what’s a new mama to do to help her perineum after birth?

Massage this area!

What do you do?  It’s simple!

Take your thumb pad and place it just inside your vaginal opening. Your knuckle should stay on the outside. Place your index finger on your anal sphincter. Start on one side as far as you can go and pinch the two fingers together and see if it feels soft and mushy or hard and resistant to compression. You want your tissues to be soft and supple. Work your way along toward the opposite side and see where the tissues are resistant to compression.   Where there is resistance you can apply pressure by gently compressing the area between your fingers while breathing into the area at the same time. Hold this pressure until you feel the tissues soften and release.

Scar tissue can create thickening and resistance to mobility.   Compression and pressure can help release this but sometimes scar tissue needs more. If you find scar tissue that is not releasing to pressure there can be an emotion stuck in there. Honoring that feeling and releasing whatever emotion is there is needed before it can let go. To read more about how scar tissue and emotions are connected check out this blog post.

Pinching between the anal opening and the vagina works on the upper half of the anal sphincter. For the lower part take your index finger and apply pressure around the sphincter from 3 to 9:00 if you think of it as a clock face. Check to see if you feel any spot more resistant than the others. If you do gently apply pressure with your finger in a downward motion and just hold it until you feel the spot release.

Massaging this area before every bowel movement can allow the tissues to expand more easily for your stool. This can help keep some of the excess pressure off your fissure area and potentially help it heal. Decreasing any resistant or thickened tissues helps to normalize the tissues so your stool flows through more easily.

There’s so much more to all of this that if you don’t find relief from doing the above, please go see a women’s health physical therapist or a holistic pelvic care specialist to get some help. You can find a practitioner near you by checking out these websites:   MoveForwardPT.com or WildFeminine.com

 

 

Pain with Sex

January 16, 2014 in Childbirth, Pelvic Floor, Women's Sex Issues

Sex Doesn’t have to be Painful!

When you think of having sex, what’s your initial reaction?  Is it one of fun, pleasure, and enjoyment?  For many women it’s not.  In fact it’s down right painful.  Their response is one of fear, pain and simple avoidance.  It’s sad that some women are not interested in ever having sex again.    It doesn’t need to be this way.

I”ve seen so many women in my practice who have gone to multiple doctors who all look at their vagina’s and say, “well, it looks normal in here.  There’s nothing wrong, must be all in your head, try a little bit more wine beforehand!”  And for most women suffering from pain with sex, all the wine in the world won’t help their situation.

What most doctor’s aren’t trained in looking at is the mobility of the tissues.  How can the vaginal, or pelvic floor muscles move and stretch?  They aren’t pressing around in there to find out.  So when they look at the tissues, it all looks normal and healthy.  Yet if they were to just press on the sides of your vaginal opening they would most likely find brick walls or tissues that don’t have the ability to expand or stretch.  We need our vaginal tissues to be able to move up and down and expand out in a circle in order to enjoy intercourse without pain.

There are two types of pain with intercourse, insertional pain and deep thrusting pain.  Insertional pain is a problem with the pelvic floor muscles being able to expand and stretch open to allow the penis to enter.  Deep thrusting pain is an inability of the vaginal tissues to move up and down.  The uterus or bladder may be inhibited from moving upwards so every deep thrust is like hitting a brick wall, creating pain.  Both of these issues can be healed by seeing a women’s health physical therapist.

Some common issues that can create painful intercourse for insertional pain are falls on your tailbone and buttocks, childbirth, and trauma from abuse whether physical or emotional.  Impact injuries to the tailbone area cause the muscles to tighten up to protect the area not allowing them to relax and stretch.  Any tearing to the pelvic floor area during childbirth creates scar tissue making the area less mobile.  Also I find many women’s pelvis are still in a childbirth position with their sit bones still splaying out to the side putting stretch on the pelvic floor tissues.  Helping them to come back together again relieves the strain on the tissues.  Emotional or physical abuse creates a subconscious tightening of the pelvic floor  area.   Helping women reconnect and reclaim this area and feel safe again can help  the muscles release this held tension.

C-section or any lower abdominal surgical scars or car accidents usually cause deep thrusting pains.  Scar tissue prevents the organs from moving up and down and creates a wall between the tissues.  Every time there is deep thrusting that hits this block, pain is created.  Massaging your lower abdomen and making sure your tissues can move freely upwards and side to side should help alleviate this pain.  I have a video on my website, How to Massage Your C-Section Scar that you can view for free.  It doesn’t matter how long it’s been since your surgery you can always get more mobility in the tissues with massage.

Please help spread the word to women so they know there is help for them in this area.  It really saddens me that women are not able to enjoy themselves fully.  A women’s health physical therapist can help you with this issue.  For the most part, I just need to see someone one time and they are back to enjoying intercourse again freely without pain.  Reach out, get help and enjoy sex again!  Good luck!

Helping Women Heal Their Body After Birth

July 10, 2013 in Pelvic Floor, Pelvis, Post Partum

Being a Women’s Health Physical Therapist has given me the privilege of working with a lot of post partum women.  I have a profound respect for the body’s ability to birth a baby.   It is a natural event that the body is designed to perform.

While birth is a natural function of the body, it is not designed to handle the effects of prolonged pushing or a baby that comes out in a less than ideal way.   These conditions place excessive strain on the pelvis and vaginal tissues and create issues.  Issues that a woman doesn’t have to just deal with for the rest of her life, but can get help with and fully recover.  That is, when she gets help.   Often times women are left to just deal with theses issues on their own and learn to just live with them.   Many are convinced or made to believe it’s just a natural side effect of childbirth.   But it doesn’t have to be this way!

A large majority of issues such as painful intercourse, incontinence, a pressure or falling out feeling in the vaginal area from organ prolapse, or just your body not feeling the same anymore, can all be helped by working with a women’s health physical therapist.

Helping Women Get the Help they Need!

Birthing professionals need to understand the effects a birth can have on a woman’s body and help them get the support they need to help their pelvis come back to it’s normal alignment and get their vaginal tissues released.    This idea that birth is a natural function and we just spring right back to our pre-pregnancy state doesn’t always happen for all birthing women.   The birthing professional needs to listen to the post partum woman and help them to understand that what they are experiencing in their body is an effect of birth and there is help.

Also understanding that when a birthing woman gets to a point in her labor where she feels like she doesn’t want to go on, it’s too much, or “just get this baby out of me now!” are all signs where the body can register the event as traumatic.  When trauma occurs the tissues get stuck in the position she is in during the traumatic moment.  The woman may not vocally say these words, it may just be a fleeting thought but those tissues respond accordingly.    After the birth is over when you are reviewing the birth with the new mama, asking her if she got to that point of wanting things to stop or be done could give you an idea if any trauma effects may have occurred.

Releasing Trauma in the Bodymassage

When we experience any traumatic event our body has three different options to protect itself.  We can either choose to fight the event, try and flight from it or we just freeze.  During labor, fighting and running away are not an option.  The body’s only choice is to freeze, so the tissues get stuck in whatever position they are in at the time.

Usually this occurs during the pushing phase.   When women are pushing their ischiums, or sit bones, are splayed out to the side, their sacrum is nutated, where the tailbone is farther away from the pubic bone, and their tissues are bearing down.   A traumatic response can keep these tissues in this position well after the birth is over.

By listening to the tissues on an energetic level, one can feel what they still want to do.   Helping a new mom tune into the effected area and realize that the birth is over can bring the tissues into a more neutral state.

When I assess post partum women’s tissues on an energetic level, many of them present with their bladder and uterine tissues still bearing down as if they are continuing to push a baby out.    By just placing my index finger on the urethra and bladder and just listening to what that tissue wants to do, most of the time my finger gets pushed out of the vagina.

The great thing is, it’s easy to fix this problem.  By having the woman bring her attention to the tissues I’m touching  she can help them to realize the birth is over, that the tissues can stay up and inside.  The tissues retract back up and in like a turtle pulling its head back into its shell.

Bringing the ischiums back into midline also helps to relax the pelvic floor tissues.  Since the pelvic floor muscles attach to the sides of the ischiums, when they are splayed out and stuck there, the pelvic floor muscles can have too much stretch on them not allowing them to relax and contract fully.  Sometimes one ischium gets more pressure than the other, creating an imbalance in the pelvis, especially when sitting.  To learn more about pelvic trauma in birth, read this blog.

The vaginal tissues may need help releasing the effects of the baby turning it’s head to come out.  Many times I can still feel the twisting effect on the pelvic floor tissues from this part of the birth.  Soft tissue mobilization of the vaginal tissues can help restore normal function and contraction ability of the pelvic floor muscles.  Read more here.  Without this type of work regaining strength in the pelvic floor muscles can be like beating your head against a wall.  The muscles need to be released in order to work properly.   But in order to free up these tissues, any trauma that may be present in the tissues needs to be released first.

I had one mom I worked with who had seen another women’s health physical therapist for 12 sessions and she reported that after every internal session of massage with this PT, her pelvic floor area would ache and hurt afterwards.  This is a sign that there is trauma in the tissues.  When a tissue with tension in it doesn’t want to let go or release, there is trauma that needs to be addressed first.  Also when a tissue reacts by hurting worse after a session, the body is trying to tell you it does not like that approach, something else needs to happen first.  By listening to the tissues and sensing them you can tell when they are willing or unwilling to release.  There is a different quality to the tissues when trauma is present.

Working with trauma in the tissues can be challenging, depending on the amount of trauma one has experienced.  A lot of times with birth, just the act of bringing a woman’s awareness to the tissues, helping her breathe down into the affected area can help them to release.  Also helping her go back to remembering herself before the moment of trauma and reconnecting to herself then can help release the tension and trauma in the tissues.  This work needs to be extremely gentle and respectful.  Forcing any tissues in the vaginal area is very counterproductive.

Helping new moms recover from the effects of birth needs to be a bigger priority in our country.   In France, women get 8 physical therapy visits after giving birth.  Getting moms the support and help they need to heal from the effects of trauma from birth and get their body and tissues back into their proper place should be available for every woman who has had a baby.    I wish I could see every post partum woman just once to get her on the path to reclaiming her body and healing after birth.

 

 

4 Reasons New Moms Need Physical Therapy

April 23, 2013 in Bladder issues, Pelvic Floor, Post Partum, Prolapse, Women's Health Issues

4 Reasons New Moms Need Physical Therapy: This week’s featured guest blogger is Ginger Garner, PT, MPT, ATC, PYT.  Visit Ginger at  www.gingergarner.com and www.professionalyogatherapy.org

 

Pregnancy and childbirth exact an enormous toll on a woman’s body. It is transforming and beautiful, but when a mother does not get the physical and emotional support she needs, the effects can be devastating.

I am a new mother, three times over. Each time after I have given birth, I have benefited enormously from physical therapy afterwards. I could not stand strong, fit, and wholly healed without it.  massage

I am also a physical therapist, myself, and feel that every woman should know her rights to receive physical therapy as a new mother. One of the many fields of specialization in physical therapy is women’s health. I bet you didn’t know that. That’s okay. Most doctors don’t either.

A physical therapist (PT) in women’s health is dedicated to helping women get their bodies back after birth. They can treat a myriad of issues, including pelvic and back pain, incontinence, and other ailments. The American Physical Therapy Association’s 2010-11 report titled Today’s Physical Therapist: A Comprehensive Review of a 21st-Century Health Care Profession, states “physical therapists are committed to facilitating each individual’s achievement of goals for function, health, and wellness.” The core values of a physical therapist are “altruism, accountability, integrity, clinical excellence, social responsibility, and compassion.”

The sad fact, though, is that most new mothers will never get the therapy they desperately need after giving birth.

But I am passionate about turning the tide. All too often, women in general, not just new mothers, do not receive the health care they need. Read my article which reviews the shocking statistics about the crisis in women’s health care today in the US.

A Prime Example of Falling Through the (Medical) Cracks

I have had patients and friends who have suffered from pelvic pain, sexual dysfunction, painful scarring, chronic incontinence, and lower back pain for so long that it has severely altered their quality and enjoyment of life.

A friend recently came to me asking for advice for another girlfriend. Let’s say her name is Teresa. Teresa had just undergone major abdominal surgery (think C-section) and was having awful abdominal pains and even headaches.

Knowing that the two are related, based on her surgery type and plan of care, I immediately asked if the surgeon had referred her to physical therapy. Of course the answer was no. Her plan of care did not include any post-operative physical therapy. In fact, when I asked Teresa directly, she said her doctor (a woman, mind you) had never even mentioned needing physical therapy.

I was upset by what I felt was an oversight by the physician to refer Teresa to therapy, but mostly I felt a surge of urgency to help her. This woman needed therapy immediately, yesterday, even. She was floundering, depressed, in pain, and alone at home six weeks after major surgery on her reproductive organs due to a cancer scare. She had no idea how to get better (she had been a marathoner) now that she had this huge scar (larger than that of a C-section) across her abdomen. Even coughing caused pain, and the related headaches and back pain were terrifying.

But, it was not the doctor’s fault. Not really.

Doctors are educated very little, if at all, about PT services in medical school. A good friend with an MD sister said this when asked if she had learned about PT in medical school: “sure, we had education about what PT’s do in medical school. It was a single lecture, on one day, it was optional, and it covered all allied health care services.”

Physical therapists spend a similar amount of time in earning their degree in physical therapy (7-8 years) as doctors do in medical training. There really is no way a single optional lecture in medical school can prepare physicians to know what PT’s do and how to refer for physical therapy.

The Take Home Message

Be your own advocate in health care. Before going into surgery or giving birth, educate yourself about what to expect and what you will need for your body to heal fully.

The biggest mistake a mother can make in seeking maternity care is assuming her doctor knows best. The doctor may not even know PT’s treat women’s health issues, much less how to refer to PT for prenatal or postpartum rehabilitation.

There is good news though. Here are the tools you need to get physical therapy after giving birth:

First, BEFORE you give birth, ask your doctor is he/she refers to physical therapy after giving birth. If you already have low back or pelvic pain during pregnancy, then you should get a referral for physical therapy now. Do not wait until after giving birth.

When asked why you need it (physical therapy), you can give them these four reasons:   click here to read more

 

 

 


GingerGarnerpicGinger Garner PT, MPT, ATC, PYT

Ms. Garner is an educator, integrative physical therapist, and founder of Professional Yoga Therapy Studies, an organization that creates inter-disciplinary curricula and educational competencies for using yoga in medicine and rehabilitation.  Ms. Garner received her Master of Physical Therapy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she completed studies in the School of Medicine and School of Public Health.  Ms. Garner began working in the field of integrative therapies in 1995, after becoming licensed in sports medicine.  Her clinical specialties include public health education, orthopaedics, and pain management, with a focus on maternal health.

Ms. Garner has been writing, teaching, and lecturing for hospitals and medical practices throughout the US since 2000, and in 2012 she joined the Caring Economics Coalition and the work of Dr. Riane Eisler, who she credits as one of her greatest mentors.  Ms. Garner now consults pro bono with medical schools at several domestic and international universities in order to develop integrative medicine curriculum in medical therapeutic yoga.  She is currently an instructor with Medbridge Education and consultant at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Misericordia University’s Doctoral Physical Therapy program, and the University of Saskatchawan School of Medicine.  These evidence-based programs are a first of their kind in North America.

Ms. Garner considers her most important work to be in maternal health care advocacy and health care policy,  where through her multi-media platforms she works to increase awareness of, and eliminate barriers to, receiving holistic and integrative health care.   Ginger is a mother of three children, and lives with her husband and rowdy sons on a small island off the east coast of the US.  Ginger can be contacted at www.gingergarner.com and www.professionalyogatherapy.org.

How to do Kegel Exercises Correctly

March 4, 2013 in Exercise, Pelvic Floor, Pelvis

Doing Kegel’s Correctly

Do you know how to do a Kegel correctly?  Most women don’t!  Yet kegel exercises are all the rage.  They are the most popular piece of advice given to women for any condition in the pelvic region.  Yet many women don’t know how to engage their pelvic floor muscles correctly.    Let me explain the correct way to contract these muscles.

pelvic floor musclesTo figure out what needs to be contracted let’s find the boney landmarks that house the pelvic floor muscles.  Sit on a hard chair and roll your pelvis forward so you become aware of your pubic bone coming into contact with the chair.  Then roll your pelvis backwards so your tailbone feels the contact of the chair.  Then move your weight over to one side so you feel your sit bone in contact with the chair and then repeat to the other side.  You have just contacted all four boney landmarks to where your pelvic floor muscles attach.  To contract your pelvic floor muscles think about pulling your pelvic floor muscles up and inside your pelvis while bringing all four of those boney landmarks together.   Imagine a purse string being pulled tight to gather all the material to close the purse.

If you are doing a kegel correctly you should not have any muscles on the outside of your body visibly contracting.  Nobody should know you are doing a kegel.  If your pelvic floor muscles are weak or you don’t know how to activate them correctly, your butt, leg and abdominal muscles kick in to try and help out.

In order to make sure you are doing the exercise correctly there are two positions you can get into that guarantee you are contracting only your pelvic floor muscles.  One position is sitting in a chair with your knees spread wide open and leaning forward with your trunk. Your arms can rest on your legs.  As you contract your pelvic floor muscles your legs should remain still.

An even better position is child’s pose.  In this position you are kneeling on the floor, sitting back so that your butt is resting on your heels and your body is draped over your thighs with you arms either out in front of you or by your sides.  There is no way you can contract anything but the pelvic floor muscles in this position.  If you don’t feel anything happening between your sit bones then your pelvic floor muscles are either too weak or just not contracting.

Another way to figure out if you are contracting your pelvic floor muscles correctly is to try and stop the flow of urine.  If you can stop the flow or are able to deflect it a bit then those are your pelvic floor muscles you are using to make that happen.  As you try this pay attention to what is happening in those muscles to get a feel for that contraction.

Warning!  It is important that you do not test your muscles by stopping the flow of urine all the time.  Testing your contraction ability about once a month is preferred.  If you stop the flow of urine too often your bladder gets confused and doesn’t know if it should start or stop the flow.  The nervous system that controls the bladder is very sensitive and you don’t want to be messing it up by testing your muscles too frequently.   Remember testing about once a month should be tops!

NORMAL STRENGTH OF THE PELVIC FLOOR

A strong pelvic floor muscle should be able to hold a contraction for 10 seconds.   See how long you can hold your contraction before the muscles fade away from weakness.  You can work on trying to hold the contraction for 10 seconds by just reengaging the muscle for the duration of those 10 seconds and then relaxing.  Just do 3 sets of these 10-second holds and then you could be done, for the hour.  Doing that every hour will hopefully improve your strength.  If it doesn’t get stronger or you have difficulty even engaging the muscles, stay tuned for my next post on the problems with kegel’s.

 

 

Post Partum Care of Your Body

February 26, 2013 in Childbirth, Pelvic Floor, Pelvis, Post Partum

POST PARTUM CARE

Congratulations on the arrival of your baby!  Now that your baby’s here, now WHAT do you do with your body!?!?

Whether you had a caesarian section or a vaginal birth your body has just completed the most strenuous feat.  After the adrenaline and fatigue wear off you may be wondering what has happened to your body?  Things may not feel normal in your abdomen or your pelvis.    That is where Intuitive Hands Physical Therapy can help!

C-Section Recovery

Remember you have just had major surgery!  You need to be protective of your abdomen and not lift anything heavier than your baby.  It’s very important to watch the way you get up and down from laying, always remembering to roll over to your side first.  Your activities should be limited the first 6 weeks until you get the all clear from your MD that your incision is well healed.

SCAR MASSAGE

Once you get that clearance it is VERY IMPORTANT to massage your scar.   You want to move the scar up, down, side to side and rub it between your fingers.  There are many layers you want to work through so start off superficially and work till you can move the tissues deep down in the abdomen.   It may be very tender initially but do what you can to keep the scar tissue from adhering to other tissues.  It’s been my experience that 10-15 years down the road women come to me with frequency of urination.  They have scar tissue from their c-sections that is inhibiting the bladder from expanding.  A session or two of scar tissue release work gets them back to normal voiding frequencies.  You can avoid this by massaging your scar early on.

VAGINAL BIRTHS

The pelvis is amazing in its ability to open up to pass a baby through its canal.  Sometimes during labor the mechanics of the pelvis opening doesn’t work properly and you can experience a difficult delivery and have lots of back labor or pelvic pains.  If the delivery was traumatic in any way the pelvis can have a hard time going back into its normal position, thus creating pain for you.  At Intuitive Hands Physical Therapy we specialize in helping the pelvis find its natural home and help you get out of pain after delivery.

THE PELVIC FLOOR

It is quite common to experience a tear to the pelvic floor during childbirth.  Depending on the degree of tear, from 1st to 4th degree, you can develop scar tissue that can inhibit the pelvic floor.  Scar tissue is not as flexible as our normal tissue so intercourse can be somewhat painful the first couple of times after childbirth.   If intercourse continues to be painful please see a women’s health physical therapist to have them work on your pelvic floor and release any scar tissue that may be present.

Scar tissue can also inhibit the pelvic floor muscles from contracting as strongly as they could thus leaving you with weakness that could contribute to stress incontinence.   Just like our shoulders get knots in them, our pelvic floor does the same.  These knots can be caused by scar tissue and can prevent the muscles from contracting fully.  A session of soft tissue mobilization, using just a gloved finger can help work out those knots and free up the scar tissue so the muscles can work more normally.  You can really tell a difference in a “Kegel” contraction after your muscles have been fully released.

 

EVERY MOM SHOULD HAVE A BODYWORK SESSION AFTER CHILDBIRTH

Your body has just completed the most arduous task!  Think about what your body has been through in the last 10 months.  The baby grew so big, your belly was huge and what do you think happened to your organs?  The baby pushed them way up into your chest and somehow they find their way back down but in the meantime they can create some mid back pains as you try to care for your wee one.

Your pelvis can get out of whack from opening so wide to allow the baby through and could use help finding its place back home again.

If you had a c-section the doctors might have taken all your small and large intestines out and go through them all to make sure there’s no kink in them before sewing you back up.   I’ve had several women come to me complaining of things just not feeling quite right in the pelvis and abdomen after the surgery, and they were right.

One session can help you feel back to normal again.  We can check to make sure your organs are happy and in their rightful places, make sure your abdominal tissues can move freely, and check to make sure your pelvis and pelvic floor are working right and all the pieces are in their proper place.

So any aches and pains you may have post partum can be addressed in a treatment session with Lynn.

Contact her today for your post partum session for your ticket back to feeling normal in your body again!

 

Hi Lynn – I wanted to tell you that last night was the first night since my last pregnancy that I slept a solid 8 hours without having to get up to pee.  Unbelievable!  And all day I have felt so different too – I can’t really describe it.  It’s like what you said, I haven’t really thought about my bladder every 10 minutes like before because it wasn’t bothering me! Again, I thought I was bordering on a compulsive disorder with how much this issue defined my life.  

So I just want to say thank you, thank you, thank you from the bottom of my heart  – if I can write a testimonial for you or share my story please just let me know.  Now I know that no amount of kegels, core conditioning, etc. was going to help this problem go away – I am just so relieved that I found you and I avoided a costly surgery because of it. 

~A. S.

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